Frequently Asked Questions about ApplicantIDs

Forgot Password or ApplicantID

Getting an ApplicantID

Using Your ApplicantID

ApplicantID Passwords

More about ApplicantIDs


I forgot my password or ApplicantID. What should I do?

Passwords are kept in an encrypted database, and cannot be looked up by anyone.

You can get a new activation code so, that you can reset your password, at the following web page.

Forgot ApplicantID or Password

Or, you can contact the IT Service Desk via phone (607-255-5500) or in person.

If you visit the IT Service Desk in person, you will need to provide proof of identity. You'll need a valid government-issued photo ID card such as a driver's license or passport or a photocopy of one of these.

Getting an ApplicantID

What is an ApplicantID?

An ApplicantID is a personal, unique identifier assigned to you. It consists of "app" plus the year for which you are applying, followed by a dash, followed by your initials, followed by one or more numbers. For example, if your name were "Eugene Walter Ewings" and you were applying for admission in Fall 2011, your Applicant ID might be app11-ewe2.

You use your ApplicantID, along with a password, to obtain access to online services.

A password is required with your ApplicantID to ensure that no one but you can access your confidential Cornell information. Your ApplicantID and password also give you access to services that are exclusive to the Cornell community.

Who is eligible for an ApplicantID?

ApplicantIDs are issued to all applicants for undergraduate admission to Cornell University.

I already have a NetID. Do I still get an ApplicantID?

Service providers can configure their services to accept ApplicantIDs, NetIDs, or both. ApplicantIDs are created for all undergraduate applicants, even if they already have a Cornell NetID.

When do new applicants receive their ApplicantID?

Beginning in September, when applications are processed all new applicants receive their ApplicantID and activation code via email. During the activation process, applicants are introduced to policies governing the use of Cornell’s computing resources.

Applicants who don't receive an ApplicantID should go to the "I never received my ApplicantID" link.

I had an ApplicantID once before. Will I get the same ApplicantID?

No, because your ApplicantID includes the year for which you are applying.

How was my ApplicantID created?

Your ApplicantID was created from the year for which you are applying, the initials of your name as it appears in the University database, and a number. For example, if your name is "Eugene Walter Ewings" and you are applying for admission in Fall 2010, your Applicant ID might be app10-ewe2

Can I change my ApplicantID?

Because your ApplicantID is a temporary identifier used only during the application process, it cannot be changed.


Using Your ApplicantID

What services can I access with my Applicant ID?

Having a Cornell ApplicantID does not, in and of itself, give you access to information or services. It simply serves as an identifier that can be used to authorize your access to services you are entitled to use.

Even if you use your ApplicantID for nothing else, you will use it to access the Undergraduate Admissions self-service Web site at https://selfservice.admissions.cornell.edu/

Cornell ties what services you can access to the role or relationship that you have with the university. CIT works with the offices of record, sponsors, and service providers to adjust privileges when your role or relationship changes. Please remember that your access can be terminated without notice if you violate the university policies on responsible use of computer systems. Therefore it is very important to know and understand these policies.

What happens to my access when I am accepted?

Students who are accepted and indicate by paying a deposit that they intend to matriculate at Cornell are assigned a NetID. A NetID is similar to the last part of your Applicant ID. Once you activate your NetID, your ApplicantID will be disabled, and you will use your NetID to authenticate to Cornell services. NetIDs are permanent, and carry both additional privileges and additional responsibilities.

What happens to my access if I am not accepted?

At the end of each annual admissions cycle, all ApplicantIDs are deleted.


ApplicantID Passwords

Is it OK to let my family, close friends, supervisor, manager, or co-workers use my ApplicantID and password?

No. Your ApplicantID is for your exclusive personal use. If someone has your ApplicantID and password, he or she can look up and/or change personal and confidential information about you.

For these reasons and others, it is a violation of university policy to share your ApplicantID and password with your family, your roommate, or anyone else. There is no reason for anyone else to know your password, despite what he or she tells you.

You are the only person who should ever use your ApplicantID and password!

Likewise, you should never  use anyone else's ApplicantID and password, even if the owner says that it is okay!

Why do I have to choose a complex password for my ApplicantID?

Your ApplicantID and password control access to highly confidential data, some of which requires protection mandated by federal legislation. Tools for cracking simple passwords are readily available, so it is essential that your ApplicantID password be strong to prevent unauthorized individuals from discovering it.

Complex passwords are akin to deadbolt locks on a door. Just as deadbolt locks are far more effective than standard locks in preventing break-ins, so are complex passwords far superior to simple passwords in protecting access to your information.

In 2002, the university auditor recommended that CIT implement technical measures to ensure that users choose secure passwords. The criteria for what constitutes a secure password were developed as a result, along with the web-based method for selecting a password.


More about ApplicantIDs

Is there more information available about ApplicantIDs?

Yes. These links provide additional information about safe computing practices, policies regarding the use of ApplicantIDs and Cornell's computing services, and more.

Responsible Use of Information Technologies

Authentication of Information Technologies Resources

Computer Security at Cornell

What if I didn't find the answer to my question?